Norwegian Puts Providence, Hartford, Newburgh Flights on Sale

Norwegian Air International, the Irish subsidiary of Norwegian Air Shuttle, recently announced its intentions to begin flights to Hartford, CT, Newburgh, NY, and Providence, RI.

After much controversy, including allegations from U.S. bodies such as the ALPA that Norwegian was setting up a “flag of convenience” in Ireland, the USDOT belatedly approved Norwegian’s application in early December 2016. Yet it was more than two months before the carrier finally put its flights on sale – with limited seats going for as low as $65 one way – on February 23, 2017.

The flights will be operated by Boeing 737 MAX aircraft on these routes:

Providence, RI to:

  • Belfast, Northern Ireland
  • Cork, Ireland
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Shannon, Ireland

Hartford, CT to Edinburgh, Scotland

Newburgh, NY to:

  • Belfast, Northern Ireland
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Shannon, Ireland

Shortly after receiving USDOT approval, Norwegian announced that, unlike its Boeing 787-800 flights to Copenhagen, London Gatwick, and Oslo, it didn’t plan to utilize Boston Logan and New York JFK. Using a 737 MAX – which has significantly less capacity than a 787-800 – “wouldn’t be profitable” at those airports, as they incur high operation fees that would need to be offset by high ticket prices given the 737 MAX’s relative capacity. However, by utilizing smaller alternative airports rather than major airports, Norwegian predicts that it will minimize overhead (through less and lower fees) and pass on savings to its customers.

Having already chosen Newburgh as its alternative option for the Tri-State Area, Norwegian announced its intention to choose between T.F. Green in Providence and Portsmouth, NH’s Portsmouth International at Pease. I opined that the logical choice would be Providence, as it boasts a significantly more populated catchment area, easy public transport, and much better connection potential. While Pease has a less-congested airport that could be home to a dedicated operation, the weight of the factors that favor Providence seemed to make the Rhode Island capital the most likely candidate.

Meanwhile, Hartford is an interesting case. Though not mentioned in the initial list of potential Norwegian destinations, the Connecticut capital is one of the largest cities in New England. While its catchment area doesn’t boast the same population as that of Providence’s, Bradley International is a convenient option for many Western Massachusetts travelers, particularly those in the vicinity of I-91.

Moreover, Bradley recently resurrected transatlantic service with Aer Lingus service to Dublin on 757-200s – a city and airline combination that I predicted when it was first rumored that Bradley had landed transatlantic service. And though it was backed by guarantees from the Connecticut government, it appears that the route has done well enough to serve as an indication that transatlantic service is a viable option. Thus, adding another city to Hartford’s growing list of destinations is perhaps a prudent move, particularly considering the minimal risk and low overhead costs of inaugurating a single 737 MAX route rather than the plethora of flights that will start serving Newburgh and Providence.

While there is significant excitement surrounding these new developments, a number of uncertainties remain. Above all, I’ve profiled what I think are the two major questions:

1. Will these fares be enough to generate new demand? Norwegian consistently speaks about its belief that it won’t just attract existing travelers, but will encourage people who haven’t previously ventured overseas to travel to Europe, much in the same way that the 747 created a surplus of supply that made air travel cheaper in the 1970s.

2. Are European travelers willing to fly into alternate airports that are an hour away from the cities they serve? While airports like JFK and Heathrow are a bit far from downtown New York and London, respectively, they are much closer to their respective downtowns than Newburgh or Luton. I would assume that Americans flying to London would, for example, be reticent to fly into Luton instead of Heathrow, so I am curious if Europeans will be equally leery, particularly given the public transit quality (or lack thereof) in the United States.

I am rather skeptical on both fronts, but I can’t say that I have a genuine prediction for how these routes will perform. Like many others, I am intrigued to see how it all plays out.

Maximizing Your Savings on Flights: See Where the Deals Are in the Northeast

As humans, many of us are leery about making large financial investments. And while buying a plane ticket isn’t an investment of the same magnitude as, say, buying a house, we should be similarly careful when booking flights. Given high operating costs, as well as the desire to make a healthy profit, airlines will do everything they can to maximize revenue. Indeed, as the old adage goes, they want to “have their cake and eat it too.”

However, sometimes it can be difficult to tell the quality of the “bargain” that you’re getting when booking a flight. For example, if you’re in Boston, you might think that you got a great deal on a $280 flight to New Orleans, only to find out that a friend paid $150 for the same flight. ‘So what’s the difference?’ you wonder. ‘It’s the same flight!’

There are numerous reasons that ticket prices fluctuate — far too many for me to list here. What I can do, though, is provide a realistic estimate of how cheaply certain flights go for. As such, I’ve compiled the cheapest destinations from the major airports in each New England state, plus the tri-state area (that’s New York and New Jersey). And while part of it is definitely selfish, as I’ve always been curious to find out what O+D combinations are consistently the cheapest, part of it is to help people gain a better understanding of what a good deal might look like.

Each fare classification, along with its destination and airport combination, is based on the common fare. Of course, there will be times where a route that normally goes for $280 suddenly goes for $110, but I am not taking those into account — this is based on scouring a variety of fare calendars and finding the lowest price that one can reasonably expect to be able to book for that route. For that reason, one-day aberrations aren’t counted.

A few things to note:
1. That old wives’ tale that Tuesday, Wednesday, and Saturday are the cheapest days to fly? It’s legit. While there are exceptions — for example, I have done Saturday to Sunday BOS-BUF and BOS-EWR round trips for less than $100 — this does hold true for the most part. For that reason, I usually try to plan trips that are 3, 4, or 7 days in length.

2. You can probably find a more technical explanation somewhere else, but it’s common for tickets to have price hikes approximately one month and two weeks out. That said, you might be able to find a steal if an airline is having trouble filling a plane (which I’ve done).

3. It might seem obvious, but flexibility is huge in terms of getting the best deals. You’d be surprised how much difference there can be in flights just one day apart.

 

Boston

Under $100

  • Baltimore
  • Chicago (ORD)*
  • Cleveland*
  • Detroit*
  • New York (EWR + LGA)

Under $200

  • Atlanta
  • Buffalo^
  • Charleston, SC
  • Charlotte
  • Dallas (DFW)
  • Fort Lauderdale
  • Indianapolis
  • Milwaukee
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nashville
  • New Orleans
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Pittsburgh
  • Raleigh-Durham
  • Richmond
  • Washington D.C. (DCA + IAD)

Under $300

  • Austin
  • Denver
  • Houston (IAH)
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles (LAX)
  • Miami
  • Phoenix

 

Burlington, VT

Under $200

  • New York

Under $300

  • Charleston, SC
  • Charlotte
  • Orlando
  • Washington D.C.

 

Hartford, CT

Under $200

  • Baltimore
  • Charleston, SC
  • Kansas City, MO
  • Milwaukee
  • Orlando
  • Washington D.C.

Under $300

  • Atlanta
  • Cincinnati
  • Cleveland
  • Detroit
  • Fort Lauderdale
  • Miami
  • Nashville
  • Raleigh-Durham
  • Richmond, VA
  • St. Louis
  • Tampa

 

Manchester, NH

Under $200

  • Baltimore
  • Columbus
  • Indianapolis
  • Milwaukee
  • Nashville
  • Washington D.C. (DCA + IAD)

Under $300

  • Charlotte
  • Chicago
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Raleigh-Durham
  • Tampa

 

New York

Under $100 – EWR

  • Boston

Under $100 – LGA

  • Boston
  • Chicago (ORD)*
  • Dallas*

Under $200 – EWR

  • Burlington, VT
  • Charleston, SC
  • Charlotte
  • Indianapolis
  • Milwaukee
  • Nashville
  • Orlando, FL
  • Portland, ME
  • Raleigh-Durham

Under $200 – JFK

  • Burlington, VT
  • Charleston, SC
  • Charlotte
  • Milwaukee
  • Orlando
  • Portland, ME
  • Raleigh-Durham
  • Richmond, VA
  • Washington D.C. (DCA + IAD)

Under $200 – LGA

  • Atlanta
  • Charleston, SC
  • Cleveland*
  • Denver
  • Detroit
  • Indianapolis
  • Kansas City, MO
  • Miami
  • Milwaukee
  • Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Nashville
  • Orlando
  • Portland, ME
  • Raleigh-Durham
  • St. Louis
  • Tampa
  • Washington (DCA + IAD)

Under $300 – EWR

  • Albuquerque, NM
  • Houston
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul
  • Phoenix

Under $300 – JFK

  • Albuquerque, NM
  • Houston
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles
  • Phoenix
  • Pittsburgh
  • Seattle

Under $300 – LGA

  • Albuquerque, NM
  • Houston
  • Los Angeles
  • New Orleans
  • Phoenix
  • Pittsburgh
  • Portland, OR*
  • Salt Lake City*

 

Portland, ME

Under $200

  • New York
  • Washington D.C. (DCA + IAD)

Under $300

  • Albuquerque, NM*
  • Atlanta, GA*
  • Baltimore (BWI)
  • Charlotte
  • Chicago (ORD)
  • Miami
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Pittsburgh
  • Raleigh-Durham

 

Providence, RI

Under $200

  • Baltimore
  • Chicago (MDW)
  • Indianapolis
  • Nashville

Under $300

  • Austin
  • Dallas (DFW)
  • Fort Lauderdale
  • Houston (IAH)
  • Orlando
  • Tampa

 

* While there are a number of dates in which you can get a fare within this range, most dates will be in the next $100 range.

^ I took a $97 round trip to Buffalo in June, but it appears that prices have hiked since.