Touchdown: First Scheduled British Airways A380 Arrives in Boston

Anticipation of the Airbus

Soaring over a crowd of around 30 people on Castle Island, the first scheduled British Airways Airbus A380 arrived at Boston Logan this afternoon. Incidentally, it touched down on Runway 4R – which was the same runway that the Boeing 747 I was on landed on in 2014 – at around 1:30 p.m.

Speedbird 213 super soaring towards Runway 4R.

Last July, when the news first broke that BA would be flying its A380s from Boston to London Heathrow in 2017, I was hesitant to put much stock in it. Things change in the aviation world all the time, and so while that didn’t stop me from writing a post on it, I think it’s worth pointing out that there’s a difference between reporting the news and buying into it.

Initially, my skepticism seemed to be well-founded: in August, BA mysteriously pulled its scheduled deployment of the aircraft, with the apparent culprit being the delayed renovation of Terminal E. At that point, I thought that the delay was due to “typical Massachusetts construction,” as we often see construction projects cost more and take longer than anticipated (e.g. the Big Dig).

However, September saw BA reinstate its plans to launch A380 service to Logan, with the new start date scheduled for a month after the original planned introduction. And while the new schedule has the aircraft visiting only three days per week (Sunday, Monday, and Friday) as opposed to the original schedule which had it lined up to come four times per week (Thursday through Sunday), it appeared that the new timeline took into account the construction of the A380-capable gates and new Terminal E lounge.

March 26, 2017

Even though Emirates holds the distinction of having flown the first scheduled A380 to Boston – a one-off flight exactly two months before this one – BA is the first carrier to land a regularly-scheduled A380 in Boston.

On multiple occasions, I have said that I prefer the 747– and particularly BA’s 747s – to the A380. While that still holds true, I have developed a newfound admiration for the A380, particularly after traveling on it in China and experiencing how modern and efficient it is, and so I went to see the maiden arrival – operated by G-XLEE as BA213 – this afternoon (the aircraft will return to London tonight as BA212).

I arrived around 20 minutes before the aircraft was scheduled to land, and was surprised to find that there were a number of onlookers waiting with their cameras, phones, and scanners. I got out my phone to open Flightradar24, and saw that the aircraft was beginning its downwind leg.

 

IMG_1060
Visible, but not much detail here.

We continued to track G-XLEE, both visually and with FR24. Soon enough, it was starting its final approach.

IMG_1065
On final.

As it got closer, the sense went from ‘this is going to happen’ to ‘this is really happening.’ Correspondingly, the plane went from being a faraway object that was barely visible to an approaching aircraft that revealed more and more detail by the second.

Having disappeared from our vision over the shipyard, the aircraft touched down on 4R, arriving at the gate 10 minutes after the tires hit the tarmac. As such, the long-anticipated event was completed.

Looking Forward

With this arrival, Boston has seen a scheduled BA A380 before New York JFK. And while this is somewhat surprising given that JFK-LHR is the busiest transatlantic route in the world and that BA is the dominant carrier on that route, there are actually a few explanations for this seemingly counterintuitive circumstance.

Moreover, the arrival of the A380 does not mean that BA will stop sending 747s to Boston. Unlike some other U.S. destinations (such as San Francisco and Washington D.C.) where BA used to send 747s but now mostly sends A380s and 777s, BA will likely continue to fly the 747 to Boston alongside the A380 for quite some time. Today is a perfect example: while BA213 and BA212 are operated by an A380, BA203 and BA202 are being flown by a 747.

Why is this?

Well, in addition to boasting good load factors on its BOS-LHR route, which means that it can fill a large number of seats, BA recently retrofitted a portion of its 747 fleet with a modernized cabin and more business class seats. Given that BOS-LHR is a route with high “premium” demand (e.g. a large number of first and business class travelers), the retrofitted aircraft still have a decent amount of life left in them, and that more than 790,000 people traveled between Logan and London Heathrow last year, it makes sense that Boston as a destination can support two four-engine, double-decker planes in the same day.

Most of all, I’m curious to know which of Logan’s runways the A380 uses. While the “main” runways – 4R/22L and 15R/33L – are obviously capable of handling an A380, I am curious to see if the two “supporting” runways – 4L/22R and 9/27 – will see any A380 action. Performance-wise, I think it’s possible, as the A380 has superior takeoff performance to the 747 and I have observed a number of 747s use 4L/22R and 9/27, but I can’t say for sure.

Despite a cloudy day, the sight of the Superjumbo was a bright spot on this particular Sunday. With any luck, there will be many more to come.

What’s Interesting About Aviation?

I’ve been asked a lot of times “why do [I] like airplanes?” Often times, my first reaction is to correct the person asking the question by telling them that “I’m interested in aviation (and not airplanes).” This may be unnecessary – in fact it probably is – but I think that simply saying that I “like airplanes” is vastly oversimplified, and makes me sound like a child easily fascinated by moving objects. Of course,  I’m never going to be able to control others’ perceptions of my interest, and I am a person who over-analyzes things in general, so I definitely understand the perception, even if I disagree with its label. Regardless, it certainly is an interesting question, and one whose answer I have contemplated time and time again over the years.

The honest answer is that there is no one particular area that catches my interest. With that in mind, I’ve divided it up into a variety of different areas. Some are able to be explained in a few sentences. Some require a number of different bullets. Some I can’t even begin to fully explain. Either way, I thought it would be interesting to share some insight into just what it is that I find intriguing.

The “Inner-Five-Year-Old” Factor

Face it, flying is something that (most of us) don’t do every day. As such, it’s understandable that one might be fascinated with the fundamentals of being in the air, even if one has flown on a particular aircraft or particular route before.

  1. Sitting inside a plane and hearing the fans go quiet, followed by the gradual grind of a jet engine starting.
  2. The noise of engines spooling up from idle to takeoff thrust (TOGA), whether sitting in front of or behind the fan.
  3. Hearing the thuds of the wheels going down the runway as a plane embarks on its takeoff roll.
  4. Feeling gravity “push down” as the plane takes off.
  5. The feeling of empowerment as the plane climbs out of the airport with takeoff power set.
  6. Visual differences between parts of the world that are moving quickly (flying over highway interchanges) versus standing still (flying over farms).
  7. Hearing (and feeling) the landing gear “bump” as it comes out prior to landing.
  8. Flying low over urban areas, getting slower and slower, while coming into land.
  9. Seeing the airport’s landscape suddenly appear under the plane.
  10. The moment of touchdown, signaling the completion of the time in air.
The Competitive Factor

Even considering the incredible breakthroughs that we as humans have had over time, flying is arguably up there with the best – it’s the fastest mode of transportation we’ve devised thus far. And I don’t care how strong you think you are – a jet engine is more powerful. Moreover, as I explained in my report chronicling my first Boeing 747 trip, I find the idea of an airport having transatlantic service as, in a way, a successful competitive triumph. Airlines don’t just take a plunge on starting long-haul service anywhere, and “making it” as far as being able to sustain those flights is certainly notable.

Admiration by the General Population

I enjoy seeing people who aren’t airplane fanatics (e.g. the general population) take a moment out of their day to look up at a jumbo and comment on its sheer power – power that can not be matched by any human. Of course, we humans are not designed to generate the same power as a GE90, and thus a shouldn’t be expected to compare ourselves to the power of a jet engine, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t be impressed by them.

Unique (and Unknown) Narrations

One of the more interesting things that I’ve found is when I’m flying home late in the day – particularly after sunset. Passing over a variety of metropolitan areas, all one can really see is the extensive range of lights – most of which are houses – present on the ground. As cliche as it sounds, each light has its own story. One may be the home of a young family, with parents trying to get their kids ready for school tomorrow. Another may be the home of a retired couple relaxing in their living room, watching the evening news. Yet another might be a studio apartment, with a single urban dweller hanging out on Facebook. I often find myself wondering what the story is behind each of those lights – and though I’ll never know, it is interesting to imagine.

Another in-flight observation that I find fascinating happens mostly during descent. Following takeoff, an aircraft gains altitude and speed at extremely high rates, so it’s difficult to observe much in depth. Leading up to landing, however, the aircraft is – generally speaking – much “lower and slower,” giving passengers an excellent view of cars driving up and down roads and highways. Much like the houses, each car has its own story. A row of cars may feature someone heading home from work, another person venturing to the grocery store, and yet another person heading out to meet a friend. There’s absolutely no way to know the true story behind all of these cars, and perhaps that’s what makes it intriguing.

The Unparalleled Complexities
  1. Think about how many steps/logistics/etc. go into a single flight. (I don’t have an actual number, since it is variable, but just imagine.)
  2. Know that approximately 100,000 commercial flights take off and land every day around the world.
  3. With those two pieces of knowledge, think about how every flight – each with its own set of steps, requirements, etc. – has to fit into the massive global puzzle comprised of approximately 100,000 flights per day.
  4. Realize how safe commercial aviation is, despite the sheer amount of logistics that every flight crew (on their own flight) and every controller (in keeping airports and air spaces efficient and safe) must deal with. Pretty impressive.
The Factor of the Unknown

Even though I’ve gained a significant amount of aviation knowledge over the years, there is still a significant amount of information I don’t know or experiences I haven’t had. This, ultimately, is what keeps me interested.

Hump Day Fare Hacks: December 28, 2016

Norwegian Index for December 28, 2016: 246.2

The past few years have seen – anecdotally speaking – a massive influx of low-cost transatlantic flights into various air travel markets. With that in mind, I decided that it might be interesting to see what an “average” price for these particular transatlantic flight deals might be. That’s how the Norwegian Index was born.

If you’ve followed Hump Day Fare Hacks, there’s a good chance that you’ve seen the Norwegian Index trend downward throughout the year. It’s fitting, then, that the Index set a new record low in its final iteration of 2016. I’ll leave you to look at the fares, as they speak for themselves.

Note: All routes profiled are based on a 7-day round trip (departing and arriving the same day a week apart), unless otherwise noted. That said, I strongly encourage you to play with a variety of dates and trip lengths and see what you can find.

 

BOSTON

 

Boston – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • April 4, 2017 (return April 13, 2017)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $266

Thoughts: This may be just a single date in 2017, but the price is good enough that it may be worth taking advantage of.

 

Boston – London Gatwick

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 23, 25, 29, 30

  • February (2017) 6, 8, 13

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $260

Thoughts: By far the lowest that this has been.

 

Boston – London Heathrow

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 15-20, 22-27, 29-31

  • February (2017) 1-3, 6-10, 12-15, 20-24, 26-28

  • March (2017) 1-3, 5-9, 13-17, 19-23

Carriers: Delta Air Lines, Virgin Atlantic Airways
Price: $473

Thoughts: The SkyTeam members are offering identical, sub-$500 fares.

 

Boston – Oslo

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 3, 10 (return April 11, 18)

  • May (2017) 1, 8 (return May 9, 16)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $254

Thoughts: Not the lowest it’s ever been, but certainly “up there” (or, perhaps, down there).

 

Boston – Paris

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 15-20, 22-24, 26, 27, 29-31

  • February (2017) 2, 3, 5-7, 9-10, 12-14, 20, 21, 23, 25, 26-28

  • March (2017) 1, 2, 5-8, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19-24, 26-31

  • April (2017) 2-7, 9-11, 19-21, 23-28, 30

  • May (2017) 1-5, 7, 8

Carriers: Air France, Delta Air Lines
Price: $425

Thoughts: As a route that usually goes for well north of $500, this one came out of left field.

 

NEW YORK

 

New York JFK – Barcelona

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 26-29, 31

  • February (2017) 2-5, 7, 9, 14

Carrier: American Airlines
Price: $376

Thoughts: Cheap cheap cheap cheap cheap.

 

New York JFK – London Heathrow

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 15-31

  • February (2017) 1, 2, 4-15, 19-28

  • March (2017) 1-23

Carriers: Delta Air Lines, Virgin Atlantic Airways
Price: $473

Thoughts: Same prices as DL and VS are offering on BOS-LHR.

 

New York JFK – Milan

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 17, 18, 24, 25, 31

  • February (2017) 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28

  • March (2017) 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, 29

  • April (2017) 4, 11, 12, 19, 25, 26

  • May (2017) 2, 3, 10

Carriers: Alitalia, Delta Air Lines, Emirates
Price: $496

Thoughts: Sub-$500 Emirates flights don’t come along every day! (Oh, and Alitalia and Delta operate this route, too.)

 

New York JFK – Oslo

Leave on:

  • March (2017) 3, 23

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $203

Thoughts: Giving the JFK-ARN all-time low a run for its money, no pun intended.

 

New York JFK – Stockholm

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 16, 18, 20, 21, 23, 25, 27, 28, 30

  • February (2017) 1, 3, 4, 27

  • March (2017) 1, 24

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $248

Thoughts: The fact that a $248 fare on JFK-ARN isn’t considered unusual says a lot.

Hump Day Fare Hacks: December 21, 2016

Norwegian Index for December 21, 2017: 269.0

While this week didn’t hit any records in terms of lowest fares, there were a number of big surprises across the board. Perhaps the biggest is that Norwegian flights from both Boston and New York to Copenhagen are selling for less than $300 round trip. Of the three major European destinations (the other two being London Gatwick and Oslo) that are served by Norwegian from both Boston and New York, I would have guessed that Copenhagen was the least likely to break the $300 mark. Then again, I wouldn’t have guessed that BOS-MAD would still be going for below $400, either. Either way, all flights listed are below $500 round trip, so these are opportunities worth exploring!

Note: All routes profiled are based on a 7-day round trip (departing and arriving the same day a week apart), unless otherwise noted. That said, I strongly encourage you to play with a variety of dates and trip lengths and see what you can find.

BOSTON

Boston – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 4, 11, 25 (return April 13, 20, and May 4)
  • May (2017) 2, 9, 16 (return May 11, 18, 25)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $279

Thoughts: Of the three Norwegian routes in Boston, I figured this was the least likely to break $300. Shows how much I know.

Boston – Frankfurt

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 5, 11, 20, 24-30
  • May (2017) 1-3

Carrier: Lufthansa
Price: $495

Thoughts: This route has hovered around $500 in recent times, but I certainly didn’t see this one coming.

Boston – London Gatwick

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 22, 25, 27, 29
  • February (2017) 1, 5, 6, 8, 12, 13

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $303

Thoughts: The low-water mark for this route. Could it break $300?

Boston – Madrid

Leave on:

  • March (2017) 6, 16, 20, 27, 29

Carrier: Iberia
Price: $381

Thoughts: I still don’t get how this one is so cheap.

Boston – Oslo

Leave on:

  • March 27, 2015 (return April 4)
  • April (2017) 10, 24 (return April 18 and May 2)
  • May 1, 2017 (return May 9, 2017)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $286

Thoughts: Beat out by CPH this week, but still running very cheap.

NEW YORK

New York JFK – Barcelona

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 17, 20, 21, 24, 26-29, 31
  • February (2017) 2-5, 7, 14, 20

Carrier: American Airlines
Price: $376

Thoughts: Considering this is a legacy carrier, this is on the verge of exceptional.

New York JFK – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 16, 20, 23, 25, 27, 30
  • February (2017) 1, 6, 8, 17, 20, 22, 24, 27
  • March (2017) 1, 6, 8 13, 15, 22

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $239

Thoughts: This seems to be Copenhagen’s week.

New York JFK – Helsinki

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 17-31
  • February (2017) 1-7, 12-16, 19-24, 27, 28
  • March (2017) 2, 3, 6-10, 13-17, 20-24

Carrier: Finnair
Price: $401

Thoughts: Out of left field.

New York JFK – Oslo

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 17, 26, 29, 31
  • February (2017) 2, 3, 5, 7, 28
  • March (2017) 21, 23, 26

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $263

Thoughts: This seems a bit more “normal” than the low of two weeks ago. Still fits in the bargain category.

New York JFK – Stockholm

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 18, 20, 21, 23, 25, 27, 28, 30
  • February (2017) 1, 4, 6, 10, 22, 24, 27
  • March (2017) 1, 6, 8, 17, 24, 26

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $244

Thoughts: It’s not as cheap as it’s been in the past, but still a bargain.

Hump Day Fare Hacks: December 7, 2017

Norwegian Index for December 7, 2017: 264.3

Oh my Stockholm.

Obviously, the new Norwegian Index record by 16.5 points is somewhat stunted due to Stockholm’s barely-believable fare. Even so, two of the other three Norwegian routes profiled this week are “insanely cheap” (less than $300 round trip).

I would guess that a $199 round trip is about as low as a transatlantic flight will go, and I would imagine that the route will be back to $250+ next week. However, I’ve been wrong before, so we shall see!

Note: All routes profiled are based on a 7-day round trip (departing and arriving the same day a week apart), unless otherwise noted. That said, I strongly encourage you to play with a variety of dates and trip lengths and see what you can find.

BOSTON

Boston – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 4, 25 (return April 13, 2017 and May 4, 2017)
  • May 2, 2017 (return May 11, 2017)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $312

Thoughts: A $1 increase over last week doesn’t change that this is exceptionally cheap.

Boston – Lisbon

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 22, 23, 29, 30
  • February (2017) 5, 6

Carrier: TAP Portugal
Price: $480

Thoughts: $12 off last week!

Boston – Madrid

Leave on:

  • March (2017) 2, 6, 13, 16, 27, 29

Carrier: Iberia
Price: $381

Thoughts: March in Madrid is looking good.

Boston – Oslo

Leave on:

  • March 27, 2017 (return April 4, 2017)
  • April (2017) 3, 10, 24 (return April 11, 18, May 2)
  • May (2017) 1, 8 (return May 9, 16)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $291

Thoughts: Still a member of the sub-$300 club.

Boston – Zurich

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 8-11, 18, 19, 23-27, 29
  • May (2017) 1-4, 6-10

Carrier: Swiss Airlines
Price: $447

Thoughts: A good deal indeed.

NEW YORK

New York JFK – Barcelona

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 13 17, 19-24, 26-29, 31
  • February (2017) 2, 3, 5, 7, 9-12, 14, 20, 27
  • March (2017) 1, 2, 21, 29

Carrier: American Airlines
Price: $477

Thoughts: Spain seems to be the place to be.

Newark – Dublin

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 10, 11, 13, 16-18, 22-25, 27, 29
  • February (2017) 2, 3, 5-7, 9, 12-14, 20, 21, 24
  • March 7, 2017

Carrier: United Airlines
Price: $522

Thoughts: Luck of the Irish.

New York JFK – Milan

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 17, 18, 24, 25, 31
  • February (2017) 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28
  • March (2017) 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, 29
  • April (2017, 4, 25, 26
  • May (2017) 2, 3, 9, 10 $496

Carriers: Alitalia, Delta Air Lines, Emirates
Price: $496

Thoughts: $496 for Emirates? Yup.

New York JFK – Oslo

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 27, 29, 31
  • February (2017) 5, 7, 21
  • March 21, 2017

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $255

Thoughts: Pretty darn good.

New York JFK – Stockholm

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 23, 28
  • March 24, 2017

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $199

Thoughts: Not a misprint.

Cork Popped: NAX to pick from PSM and PVD as alternatives to BOS

Just days after Norwegian received DOT approval for flights between Boston Logan and Cork, Ireland, the carrier made a big announcement. Instead of flying out of Logan, it will fly its Boeing 737-800s out of either Portsmouth, NH or Providence, RI. Norwegian will continue to operate 787s between Boston and Copenhagen, London Gatwick, and Oslo.

The chosen location would be the carrier’s second base to open in the U.S., after the announcement that NAX would open a base at Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, NY (SWF), around an hour north of New York City.

The Reasoning

Norwegian’s explanation for its decision is quite interesting, in my view. “To operate the Boeing 737s … from a primary airport [such as Boston] becomes much more expensive with a small aircraft type than a larger aircraft type due to limited passenger numbers,” Norwegian spokesman Anders Lindstrom said.

A Cost-Benefit Analysis

While both airports are approximately an hour from Boston, each has its own unique advantages.

Portsmouth’s advantages:

  • Pease has just one airline who operates scheduled service to the airport – Allegiant Air, a low-cost carrier whose focus is on domestic operations.
  • Less-congested city (approximately 30,000 people vs. 100,000)
  • Close to Interstate 95
  • Hourly bus service to Boston

Providence’s advantages:

  • It would appear that the catchment area for potential passengers is much larger than Pease
  • MBTA Commuter Rail service to Boston
  • Close to Interstate 95
  • Better potential for connections from other airlines
A Closer Look

There is some business sense in Norwegian’s decision. Certainly, there’s something to be said for lower operating costs, especially considering the airline’s low-cost model. Yet it remains to be seen if passengers are willing to travel an hour or more just to save a few bucks. This will be pertinent, particularly considering the extensive number of ancillary fees that Norwegian charges. Moreover, while negotiations have been going on for some time, it is a bit perplexing that Norwegian waited so long to make this declaration.

Of course, it could well be that these flights are a hit, and are the start of a big transformation. Who knows!

Hump Day Fare Hacks: November 30, 2016

Norwegian Index for November 30, 2016: 280.8

In pretty much all other weeks, a new record low by 3.5 points for the Norwegian Index would undoubtedly be the main story of the week. This week, however, there’s an even more noteworthy story: JFK-ARN going for $245.

$245. That’s less than the cheapest BOS-LAX nonstop I’ve found, and a full $11 less than my base fare of $256.30 last spring on BOS-OSL. Of course, my desire to have a window seat for the return flight saw me pay $298.30 when all was said and done, but I still found $256.30 to be cheaper than I thought I’d find on a Norwegian flight – or any intercontinental flight – in the future. Apparently not!

Elsewhere, for the third week in a row, all other prices – including legacies – stayed below $500. Impressive, no doubt, but unfortunately for the legacies, JFK-ARN gets the majority of the praise this week.

Note: All routes profiled are based on a 7-day round trip (departing and arriving the same day a week apart), unless otherwise noted. That said, I strongly encourage you to play with a variety of dates and trip lengths and see what you can find.

BOSTON

Boston – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • April (2017) 4, 25 (return April 13, 2017 and May 4, 2017)
  • May 2, 2017 (return May 11, 2017)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $310

Thoughts: A $1 increase over last week doesn’t change that this is exceptionally cheap.

Boston – Lisbon

Leave on:

  • February 23, 2017
  • March 16, 2017

Carrier: TAP Portugal
Price: $492

Thoughts: Unchanged from last week. Even with a couple of dates retracted, this is still very good.

Boston – Madrid

Leave on:

  • March (2017) 2, 5, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27, 29, 30
  • April (2017) 3, 5

Carrier: Iberia
Price: $381

Thoughts: At a quick glance, virtually identical to last week’s offerings.

Boston – Munich

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 10-12, 16, 17, 19, 20, 24-26, 29, 30
  • February (2017) 2, 5, 6, 8
  • April (2017) 3-5

Carrier: Lufthansa
Price: $427

Thoughts: The previous low that I’d seen for this route was around $490. This is significantly cheaper than that.

Boston – Oslo

Leave on:

  • March 27, 2017 (return April 4, 2017)
  • April (2017) 10, 24 (return April 18, 2017 and May 2, 2017)
  • May (2017) 1, 8 (return May 9, 2017 and May 16, 2017)

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $288

Thoughts: Like BOS-CPH, up $1 from last week, but still exceptionally cheap.

NEW YORK

New York JFK and Newark – Barcelona

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 14, 20-22, 27-29
  • February (2017) 3, 28
  • March 6, 2017

Carriers: American Airlines, United Airlines
Price: $477

Thoughts: Up a significant amount ($90 to be exact) from last week, proving that all good things must come to an end. Still, the fact that EWR-BCN is available for cheap as well is promising.

New York JFK – Copenhagen

Leave on:

  • January (2017) 23, 27, 30
  • February (2017) 1, 8

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $296

Thoughts: Not “exceptional” by Norwegian standards, but pretty darn good.

New York JFK– Madrid

Leave on:

  • December 3-8
  • January (2017) 9, 11-31
  • February (2017) 1-17 19-28
  • March (2017) 1-29
  • April 4, 2017

Carriers: American Airlines, Iberia
Price: $481

Thoughts: Another Spanish city, another $90 increase over last week. Still, sub-$500 to Spain with a variety of available dates in January and February is very, very good.

New York JFK – Oslo

Leave on:

  •  January 31, 2017
  • February (2017) 5, 7

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $265

Thoughts: Have you ever seen an athletic competition where both the winner and runner-up blow away the world record? JFK-ARN may get all the press – so perhaps I am an enabler – but JFK-OSL deserves its own special mention as well.

New York JFK – Stockholm

Leave on:

  • January 23, 2017
  • February 6, 2017

Carrier: Norwegian Air Shuttle
Price: $245

Thoughts: The price says it all.